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Posts tagged ‘college major exploration’

Looking for more than a career test!

Are you having trouble setting career goals? In searching for the right career, there are so many options and decisions. Hollandcodes.com has the tools that will help you to make the right career decisions.

Overview

There are three steps in career planning cycle that will help you achieve your career goals and search for a career.

Step One: Get a Clear Career Goal

The first step in search for a job is setting a career goal.

In order to set a career goal, you have to take inventory of yourself to determine what you can offer an employer.

You need to –

  • Build awareness, knowledge and understanding of our strengths, interests, abilities, and skills
  • List your ambitions, values, education, and experiences
  • Determine your job preferences –job duties, salary, geographic location, and work conditions

Step Two: Explore Career Options

In order to identify potential careers, you may use career exploration and
social media resources to gather the following occupational information –

  • Labor market
  • Work industries
  • Companies, organizations, or agencies
  • Specific careers

Use online career exploration resources to identify potential careers.

Step Three: Overcome Career Roadblocks

When you are trying to reach a career goal, there will always be
obstacles. You solve career problems by completing the following steps –

  • Identify educational and career planning obstacles
  • Create solutions or courses of action
  • Set achievable goals
  • Resolve conflicts
  • Commit to reach our goals

Problem solving should take into consideration personal interests, skills, values, and financial resources. Big problems are broken down into smaller, more
manageable steps. Achievable goals result in the production of new
competencies, attitudes, and solutions.

As an individual, you:

  • Set, formulate, prioritize, and rank goals
  • Clearly state our vocational interests, abilities, and values
  • Derive plans or strategies to implement the solutions
  • Make a commitment to complete the plans
  • Understand decision-making processes
  • Evaluate the primary choice
  • Consider a secondary occupational choice, if necessary

Decision-making processes include:

  • Develop a career plan
  • Identify potential occupations
  • Select appropriate educational programs
  • Figure the costs of educational training
  • Consider the impact of career decisions

Step Four: Execution

You execute your career plans when you use different strategies –

  • Reality testing
  • Social Media
  • Job Search Strategies – Resume Writing and Interview Preparation

Reality Testing

While implementing and, you translate vocational interests, abilities, and
skills into job opportunities. You do reality testing by implementing
the following strategies –

  • Informational interviewing
  • Networking
  • Job shadowing
  • Internships
  • Part-time employment
  • Full-time employment
  • Volunteer work

We have a variety of different topics that we use different career/ academic advising sessions –

  • Selecting Career test
  • Different career tests
  • Other career topics – social media, resume writing and interviewing

Different Career Tests

We offer assistance with interpreting the following tests –

 Get more details about our career and academic coaching

3 Questions You’re Not Asking That Will Guide Your Career Choice.

Brad Minton, MS, LPC, NCC

Career and Academic Counselor, Instructor, Speaker

Reproduced with permission from author

Minton, B. (2016, September 9).3 Questions You’re Not Asking That Will Guide Your Career Choice. Retrieved from https://www.linkedin.com

Working with teenagers and young adults everyday who are coming to college is extremely rewarding, and educational to say the least. Being a career counselor, I have the task of helping students discover their education and career path. The one thing that I have come to discover in the process of helping them is their ideas about career are usually fairly vague.

That in and of itself is not the issue.  Most experts agree that as many as half of all college freshman have not solidified their major and/or career choice, and 75% will end up changing their path as they work towards their degree. Uncertainty is a completely understandable and expected aspect of being a new college student.

However, over time, eventually students will start attempting to gain more clarity on their vision for the future and it is here where the problems arise. Generally the first mistake they make is simply choosing a major or career path too hastily, rather than doing the necessary self-exploration. They feel compelled to simply “choose one”, and unfortunately, it is this rush to decision that leads so many to change their majors two and three times before graduation. They simply didn’t understand what they were getting into.

If they are in fact, taking some valuable time to process their decisions, they still can falter and get off track. How? By simply asking themselves the wrong questions.

Because we tend to associate our work and our careers with time spent (roughly a third of our adult life), one of the first questions students tend to ask is “Will I like what I’m doing?”, or “Will I have an interest in it?”. While interest is absolutely a necessary ingredient to career satisfaction, the question that needs to be asked is “Will this career give me fulfillment?“. You can have interest in a lot of things but they may not fulfill you in a career unless you find the modality which allows you to combine both your interests and your values. Values are the key ingredient which most closely leads to fulfillment because they speak to your soul. They are characteristics of you that cannot be easily negotiated. Interests and values can conflict. If I have a value for autonomy and an interest in computers, I could end up feeling restricted because it may not give me the independence I need depending on the type of work and setting. So again, the deeper question is not what is just going to interest me, but what is going to fulfill me.

A second question students ask themselves often is “What do I want to do?”. The reason this question is often not going to provide as much substance to their career choices is that is focuses more on activities rather than purpose. You can give anyone tasks to complete and they will do it……for a period of time. Eventually, the question will arise of why does it matter? Knowing what to do, works in the short term, but knowing why will ultimately make it last, because the why determines the level of investment by giving the activities a purpose. The key question that students must get to is “Why do I want to do…?”

The third question that tends to come up a lot is “What do I want to get?”. Students are focused in on the perks of working: salary, vacations, retirement, advancement, independence, etc. The main reason why this is of less importance is simply because all of those things will change with time and location. How much money you think you should be earning will change as you advance. Technology will ultimately change how you work. Your level of advancement will change. You’re colleagues will change. Everything in the labor market is moving at a tremendous speed and constantly evolving, thus whatever monetary gain you get from it, is subject to the same. The deeper question you have to ask is not what I want to get, but “What do I want to give?“.

By asking yourself this vital question it ties into your fulfillment AND purpose on the deepest level of all. Giving is the ultimate sacrifice, and when we decide to give, we make the resolution that it is for a higher purpose than ourselves. What you choose to give the world is your way of making your unique mark which builds you up, plus it will provide you with more satisfaction than anything you could get, because you’ve fully committed to the purpose that fulfills you.

Additional note:  We hope that you enjoyed Brad Minton’s article.  Get more information about career exploration tools!

What is your code?

How do your interests relate to potential careers and possible college majors?

Are you an Artist Creator, Conventional Organizer, Enterprising Leader, Investigative Thinker, Realistic Doer and Social Helper?

Artistic Creator

 

Artistic Creators like to – —

  • Write stories, poems, or other creative writings
  • —Enjoy the arts, theater, and dance
  • —Play musical instruments
  • —Like to paint or sculpt

Facts about Artistic Creators

  • Characteristics: Complicated, Original, Impulsive, Independent, Expressive, Creative
  • Strengths: Uses imagination and feelings in creative expression
  • Potential Careers: Artist, Musician, Actor/ Actress, Designer, Writer, Photographer
  • Possible College Majors: Art, Theater, Graphic Design, Music, Journalism, Communication

Conventional Organizer

Conventional Organizers like to – —

  • Put things in order
  • Attend to detail
  • Handle things in a systematic manner
  • Desire to be efficient

Facts about Conventional Organizers

  • Characteristics: Careful, Conforming, Conservative, Conscientious, Self-controlled, Structured
  • Strengths: Orders activities paying attention to details
  • Potential Careers: Accountant, Banker, Editor, Office Manager, Librarian, Medical Laboratory Assistant
  • Possible College Majors: Business, Accounting, Management

Enterprising Leader

Enterprising Leaders like to –

  • Manage people and projects
  • Persuade, take action, set goals
  • Work well in groups
  • Sell products and services

— Facts about Enterprising Leaders

  • Characteristics: Persuasive, Energetic, Sociable, Adventurous, Ambitious, Risk-taking
  • Strengths: Leads, manages, and organizes
  • Potential Careers: Manager, Producer, Lawyer, Business/ Marketing, Executive, Entrepreneur, Principal
  • Possible College Majors: Pre-Law, Business Management and Administration, International Business, Political Science

Investigative Thinkers

Investigative Thinkers like to –

  • Like to invent or research
  • Solve problems
  • Work with ideas
  • Use computers
  • Love knowledge

Facts about Investigative Thinkers

  • Characteristics: Analytical, Intellectual, Reserved, Independent, Scholarly, Judgmental
  • Strengths: Works with abstract ideas and intellectual problems
  • Potential Careers: Biologist, Chemist, Historian, Researcher, Doctor, Mathematician
  • Possible College Majors: Biology, Chemistry, Nursing, Pre-Medicine, Mathematics, History

Realistic Doers

Realistic Doers like to –

  • Like working with tools or machines
  • Prefer to work outdoors
  • Enjoy playing sports

Facts about Realistic Doers

  • Characteristics: Frank, Practical, Focused, Mechanical, Determined, Rugged
  • Strengths: Manipulates tools, Possesses mechanical, manual, or athletic ability
  • Potential Careers: Craftsman, Fitness Trainer, Optician, Policemen, Fire Fighter, Physical Education Teacher
  •  Possible College Majors: Justice Studies, Fire Science, Athletic Training, Martial Arts, Corporate Fitness, Physical Education

Social Helpers

Social Helpers like to –

  • Like to teach and serve
  • Are good listeners and communicators
  • Work well in groups
  • Show empathy

Facts about Social Helpers

  • Characteristics: Helping, Informing, Teaching, Inspiring, Counseling, Serving
  • Strengths: Interacts with people, concerned with the welfare of people
  • Potential Careers: Teacher, Clergy, Coach, Therapist, Nurse, Counselor, Sociologist
  • Possible College Majors: Nursing, Counseling, Social Science, Education

Interested in finding your code …

Go to bit.ly/29EUm0J

6 Personality Styles to Explore Careers!

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The 6 Personality Type Explorer helps you tap into your hidden potential You receive inspiration and motivation to explore your interests.  You have access to tools to identify potential careers and training options.

  • Discover who you really are and understand your likes, dislikes, and interests.
  • Match your likes, interests to careers.
  • Find training programs that are matches to the careers that you are interested.
  • Succeed in planning a career.

This course will motivate you as you explore careers and training options.

Career Development Tools

Awareness, Assessment, and Knowledge Guide outlines the process of selecting a career assessment.  The process includes:

  • Introduction to Career Planning
  • Steps to Self Awareness
  • Tools To Assess Self Awareness
  • Selection of a Free Test or Career Assessment
  • Features Of Career Self Assessments Tests
  • Career Test Checklist

Career Decision Making Tools

  • Discover who you really are and understand your likes, dislikes, and interests.
  • Match your likes, interests, skills, and personality styles to careers.
  • Find training programs that are a match to the careers that they are interested.
  • Succeed in planning a career.

The 6 Personality Type Explorer will provide you with tools to motivate you as you explore careers and college majors.

Awareness, Assessment, and Knowledge Parent, Teacher, and Adult Guide outlines the process of selecting a career assessment.  The selection process includes –

  • Introduction to Career Planning
  • Steps to Self Awareness
  • Tools To Assess Self Awareness
  • Selection of a FREE Test or Career Assessment
  • Career Test Checklist
  • Features of Career Self Assessments Tests

The Guide to Career Exploration and Planning is for teens or adults who need a manual that will guide them through the steps of career planning process.

The topics included in the Guide are –

  • Career Planning Map
  • Self-Analysis, Self Awareness, or Self Assessment
  • Career Exploration Tools
  • College Major/ Training Program Exploration Tools

Career exploration tools provide the following information –

  • Overview
  • Skills
  • Values
  • Outlook
  • Earning
  • Interest Profile
  • Working Conditions
  • Contact Info
  • Areas of Study

College exploration resources lists the following facts –

  • Location of School
  • Majors Areas of Study
  • Name of School
  • Size and Cost
  • Region in the USA
  • Type of School

6 Personality Type Explorer has the following activities –

  • Read Ten Top Tips to select a career test
  • Use career test checklist
  • Get access career test
  • Record career test results
  • Record interest areas
  • Explore careers
  • Explore degree/ training programs
  • Explore colleges

6 Personality Type Explorer is  Now on sale! Cost $10

Immediate Access!

Career Development and Social Media Converge

New Holland Codes Network

New Mission, Vision, & Web Sites

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Digital learning and media technology are impacting the delivery of career development resources. There must be a convergence and synchronization of career development principles with today’s electronic media.

The Holland Codes Resource Center has developed a new mission, vision, and web sites.

  • New Mission – Provide career development and social media resources engaging, connecting with digital learners utilizing printed, web-based tools and technology
  • New Vision – Motivate, inspire, and empower people to have an awareness of their full potential
  • New Web Sites – Promote the convergence of career development and social media concepts

Hollandcodes.com

hollandcodeProduct Specialists »

Holland Codes related printed career tests, online career tests, books, downloads, digital courses, and other resources –

Career-Social-Media.com

Best career products »

Career-social-media.com Career-social-media.com – Our Career and Social Media Resource Center provides information about career, college major, job search, and social media resources.

homepage

Members get access to –

Here are videos that provide an overview of the resource center –

New Store

Explorecareersandcollegemajors.com »

Navigate the Explore Careers & College Majors store.  Here is our list of resources –

Visit our new web sites to see how career development and social media converge.

34 Holland Code Career Web Sites

Holland Career Model

Holland Career Model

 

Are you looking for tools to explore careers and college majors?

Self-awareness is the key to self-discoveryKnowing your interests is the first step to identifying a potential career.

The Holland Codes interest areas are:

  • Realistic
  • Investigative
  • Artistic
  • Social
  • Enterprising
  • Conventional

The Holland Code Career Models match jobs into job codes, interest clusters, work personality environments, or personality types.

There is also a definite relationship between Holland Codes and college majors.

In order to maximize the resources below, you need to use the right career tool.  The Self Directed Search is  the  most reliable and valid Holland Code instrument worldwide.After taking a career test,  review this list of some college and universities to explore Holland Codes, careers, and college majors

  1. Career Decisions Handbook 
  2. Career Interest Game – University of Missouri
  3. Career Interest Matching – Riverland Community College 
  4. Career Interests – Your Holland Code
  5. College Majors and the Holland Codes – Salisbury University
  6. Colorado College Majors with Holland Codes
  7. Guide to Holland Code – MU Career Center – University of Misouri
  8. Holland (Edison Community College) 
  9. Holland Code – Career Services – www.usu.edu 
  10. Holland Code | clas.arizona.edu 
  11. Holland Code and College Majors – Central Oregon … 
  12. Holland code Duke University Career Center  
  13. Holland Code Quiz – Rogue Community College
  14. Holland Code Resources Purdue North Central 
  15. Holland Code to majors (UMKC: University College)
  16. Holland Codes — Central Piedmont Community College 
  17. Holland Codes – University of North Florida
  18. Holland Codes and Career Interests – University of Manitoba
  19. Holland Code and College Majors – Central Oregon … 
  20. HOLLAND CODES AND MANCHESTER COLLEGE MAJORS 
  21. Holland’s Code and Success in College (Northland International University) 
  22. Holland’s Theory and Implications for Academic Advising … (Florida State University) 
  23. Holland’s Code and Success in College
  24. Interests, College Majors and Careers Packet – Johnson … 
  25. K12 Educators Guide – College Foundation of North Carolina
  26. Majors and Careers by Interest | Career Services 
  27. Majors by Holland Code – University of Oklahoma 
  28. Major – Montana State University 
  29. Overview of John Holland’s Six Career Themes 
  30. RAISEC (Multi-Language) – UHCC 
  31. RIASEC – Explore your interests – California State University … 
  32. RIASEC and Holland Codes – Indiana University South Bend 
  33. The Holland Hexagon, University of Cincinnati 
  34. UTSA Career Center ::Students:: RIASEC and Holland Codes 

Get more information about Holland Codes and how to use Holland Code career tests to explore careers and college majors.

Back to School Career Test Sale

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The following career tests are on sale –

  • Career & Life Explorer
  • Career Exploration Inventory
  • Career Interest Inventory
  • Career Personality Inventory
  • Career Values Inventory
  • Guide for Occupational Exploration Interest Inventory
  • Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)
  • My Career Profile
  • PICS Career Survey
  • RIASEC Inventory
  • Strong Interest Inventory
  • Transferable Skills Survey
  • Back to School Bulk Items (On Sale)

  Career and Life Explorer

Career Life Explorer

Career and Life Explorer is a Holland Code assessment that uses:

  • Appealing graphics
  • Easy-to-follow instructions
  • Proven career exploration principles
  • Great information to get young people thinking about their future—and encourages them to stay in school, explore positive career and learning options, and dream big

Career and Life Explorer provides the following information:

  • Start with “Uncover Career Clues.”
  • Gather career information by looking at:
    • Who they admire
    • What they do well or enjoy doing
    • What are the key values
    • How important is money
    • What kinds of people they like to spend time with
    • How much education or training they would consider
    • What work environment they prefer, and more
  • Step 2: Select top picks from among six Holland Code “Interest Groups”
  • Step 3: Look up related jobs in a chart listing hundreds of job titles from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.
  • Step 4: Use a “Discover Your Ideal Job” to write in key elements of their ideal job, including:
    • Values
    • Possible job titles
    • Skills
    • Education or training
    • Earnings
    • Other details
  • Step 5: Use an Action Plan worksheet to help plan high school courses, extracurricular activities, and other life experiences.

Format: 5.5 x 8.5, 12-panel foldout
Reading Level: Grade 6
Interest Level: Grades 6 to 12

Career Exploration Inventory

Hollandcodes.com has information about the Career Exploration Inventory.

career exploration inventory

Career Exploration Inventory is a career interest inventory with career information and career planning information.The Career Exploration Inventory:

  • Is easy to read, self-scoring, self-interpreting
  • Gathers career information by looking at past, present, and future activities of your life. These areas include Work, Leisure, and Learning activities.
  • Helps you identify Clusters and GOE Interest Areas
  • Provides a list of related jobs in a chart listing hundreds of job titles, career salary, career research, and career information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.
  • Provides additional career resources
  • Create an Action Plan
  • Help you set Short Term, Medium Term, and Long Term Goals

The Career Exploration Inventory:

  • Is backed by strong validity
  • Uses proven career exploration principles.
  • Directs cross-reference to GOE and O’Net job reference systems.

The Scores from the Career Exploration Inventory connect you to 16 GOE career interest areas or Career Clusters with:

  • Related jobs
  • Education and training options
  • Leisure activities listed for each interest area

Format: 8.5 x 11, 12-panel foldout, self-scoring/self-interpreting, consumable, no other components needed.
Interest Level: High School-Adult

With each Career Cluster/GOE purchase, you will receive with free Career Cluster, GOE Code, and Holland Code cross-reference and Internet resource sheets.

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Career Interests Inventory

The Career Interests Inventory is a Holland Code career self assessment test.The Career Interests Inventory is –

  • Inexpensive – Save money.
  • Easy to use – Complete the career self assessment test in 30 minutes.
  • Tested, proven, and dependable – Based on Dept. of Labor’s O*NET Interest Profile.

The Career Interests Inventory has a variety of jobs. Find job that need little or no preparation, 2 year associate, 4 year college, graduate degree, or professional degree.

The Career Interests Inventory is a Holland Code career self assessment test.

Career Personality Inventory

Based on the MBTI personality types

Career Personality Inventory

The Career Personality Inventory is –

  • Self- scoring, self-interpreting, consumable, no other components needed
  • Comparable results to the MBTI
  • Match personality types to careers, work styles, skills, work environments, and work preferences with this easy-to-use assessment
  • Is based on the MBTI personality types

The CPI uses a simple and innovative testing method requiring test takers to:

  • Simply circle words that describe them
  • Total the number of descriptors circled

The CPI then helps users consider how their personality relates to their careers by focusing on their top two traits.

Users can match their personality types to careers and work preferences.

Clients then use the career planning guide and worksheet to set goals and start their career research.

Valid and reliable, the CPI provides a powerful and cost-effective alternative to any organization using similar but more expensive personality inventories.

Product type: Printed booklet
Interest level: Middle School-High School
Pages Opens to 8-panel foldout
Size: 8.5 x 11

Career Values InvenTory

Career Values Inventory

The O*NET Career Values Inventory helps individuals explore over 900 O*NET job titles based on their work values and motivators.

Unlike the first edition of the Values Inventory which used a card sort to explore work values, the new edition uses an easier forced-choice method.

Consisting of only 36 items and taking less than 20 minutes to complete, this method provides accurate results in less time, as well as simplifies administration and scoring.

Once individuals have identified their most important work values, the inventory guides them to match their results to potential careers organized by both values and the preparation required (using the DOL’s five “job zones”).

In depth suggestions for further research help individuals explore those careers, and a reproducible Job Information/Action Plan worksheet helps them pursue their goals.

The inventory is self-scoring and self-interpreting, takes less than thirty minutes to complete, and is based on decades of research.

Valid and reliable, this assessment is an ideal starting point for anyone engaging in career exploration.

Its incorporation of O*NET job titles also makes it highly compatible with a wide variety of occupational resources.

The O*NET is changing. The Department of Labor is revising and streamlining the Occupational Information Network to better match the rapidly changing economy. The Second Edition of the O*NET Career Values Inventory has been substantially revised.

In addition to moving from a card sort to a forced choice mechanic, it will feature streamlined instructions, an updated list of resources, an improved job information worksheet, and job titles drawn directly from the latest version of the O*NET.

Guide for Occupational Exploration Interest Inventory (GOEII)

Guide for Occupational Interest Inventory

Guide for Occupational Exploration Interest Inventory

  • Has appealing graphics
  • Is easy-to-follow instructions
  • Is self-scoring
  • Matches your Interests to 250 Occupational Outlook Handbook and 1,000 O*NET career jobs with career salary information, career research, and career information
  • Is organized around 14 GOE career interest areas

Guide for Occupational Exploration Interest Inventory provides the following information from the ORIGINAL GOE System presented in the Guide for Occupational Exploration (3rd Edition):

Step 1: Start with the following “14 Interest Areas or Career Clusters”

  1. GOE Code 1: Arts, Entertainment, and Media
  2. GOE Code 2: Science, Math, Engineering
  3. GOE Code 3: Plants and Animals
  4. GOE Code 4: Law, Law Enforcement, and Public Security
  5. GOE Code 5: Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers
  6. Construction, Mining and Drilling
  7. Transportation, Distribution & Logistics
  8. GOE Code 6: Industrial Production
  9. GOE Code 7: Business Detail
  10. GOE Code 8: Sales &Marketing
  11. GOE Code 9: Recreation, Travel and Other Personal Services
  12. GOE Code 10: Education and Social Services
  13. GOE Code 11: General Management and Support
  14. Medical and Health Science

Step 2: Complete Inventory.
Step 3: Score profile.
Step 4: Use the “14 Interest Areas or Career Clusters” to Explore Career Options.
Step 5: Complete the Career Exploration Worksheet.
Step 6: Research career options.

Reading Level: Grade 8
Interest Level: Middle School-Adult

Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)

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The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) assessment is the most widely used personality assessment in the world – more than 2 million assessments worldwide each year.

  • Reliable, valid, versatile, and dependable – Used for more than 50 years
  • Guide to understand individual differences
  • Source of understanding on how people think, communicate, and interact

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a career assessment test and a personality test. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) types are in four groups –

  • Extraversion / Introversion
  • Sensing / Intuition
  • Thinking / Feeling
  • Judging / Perceiving

The type indicates a preference.

  • The Extrovert prefers to focus on other people and things.
  • The Introvert prefers to focus on internal thoughts and ideas.
  • The Sensing person prefers to use the five senses to receive information.
  • The Intuitive person receives input from internal thinking processes.
  • The Thinking persons judges using logic.
  • The Feeling person uses affective measures to judge.
  • The Judging aspect of the type results in sequential step-by-step mental processing.
  • The Perceiving responds in a spontaneous and flexible way.

The results from the MBTI produces the 16 types –

  1. ISTJ
  2. ISFJ
  3. INFJ
  4. INTJ
  5. ISTP
  6. ISFP
  7. INFP
  8. INTP
  9. ESTP
  10. ESFP
  11. ENFP
  12. ENTP
  13. ESTJ
  14. ESFJ
  15. ENFJ
  16. ENTJ

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Career Report

The MBTI Career Report is a career exploration tool that helps you –

  • Identify strengths and weakness that may influence the career exploration process
  • Identify job families
  • Choose a potential career
  • Select a college or other form of training
  • Provide information necessary to evaluate a possible career transition or job shift
  • Develop a career plan

The MBTI Career Report has information on –

  • MBTI Results – Reported Type and Clarity of Reported Preferences
  • MBTI Types and Career Choice – preferred work environments, and action steps
  • MBTI Types and Career Exploration – Strengths, challenges, strategies, and action steps
  • MBTI Types and Career Development – Strengths, challenges, strategies, and action steps
  • MBTI Types and Job Families – Job family ranking, Most attractive job families, Moderately attractive job families, Least attractive job families, Most popular occupations, Least popular occupations, and Tips for succeeding in atypical occupation.

DELIVERY INFORMATION: Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Career Report is an ON-LINE, Holland Code career self assessment test. When you complete your transaction, you will receive two e-mails. The first e-mail confirms payment received. The second e-mail lists the following information –

  • Product Title
  • Transaction ID
  • Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Career Report Web Site Link
  • Username
  • Password
  • Our contact e-mail explorecareers@gmail.com

My Career Profile

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My Career Profile Guidance System is a Holland career self assessment test that provides information on interests, values, skills, personalities, and Holland Codes.

My Career Profile Guidance System is –

  • Low cost – Save money.
  • Easy to use – Follow simple instructions.
  • Quick – In 20 minutes, you will have the results from the assessment.
  • Fast – Immediately match the results 1500 careers.
  • Tested, proven, and dependable – Use the database to get job earnings information

My Career Profile Guidance System provides information on interests, values, skills, personalities, Holland Codes, 1200+ occupations, and 6000 schools.

Discover your –

  • Interests
  • Values
  • Skills
  • Personality

Get information on –

  • Holland Codes
  • 1200+ Occupations
  • 6000+ Schools

Search colleges by according to the following criteria –

  • Location of School
  • Major Areas of Study
  • Name of School
  • Size and Cost
  • Region in the USA
  • Type of School

Build your career portifolio.

PICS Career Survey

Picture Interest Survey

The PICS Career Survey is a Picture Interest Test and an easy-to-do Holland Code assessment that uses 36 sets of 3 pictures as a quick way to –

  • Explore their career interests
  • Find a job that fits

The PICS Career Survey is an excellent career test for ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS and for other people –

  • Who are In ESL/GED programs
  • Who have limited reading ability
  • Who have limited knowledge of English
  • Who are developmentally delayed
  • Who are learning disabled
  • Who have special needs
  • Who have limited access to education
  • Who are chronically unemployed

The PICS Interest Test

  • Takes less than fifteen minutes to complete and score
  • Uses pictures of people at work
  • Is self-administered and self-scored

To finish the Career Survey (PICS), you –

  • Look at 36 sets of 3 pictures.
  • Choose which of the three portrayed occupations seems most interesting.
  • Total the number and kind of pictures selected.

As bonuses, with each purchase, you receive the Career Locator and Career Planning Worksheet.

The Career Locator matches Holland Code interest areas to 600 careers. Careers are placed in one of the following groups – Careers that require Short Term On-the-Job-Training, Moderate Term On-the-Job-Training, Long Term On-the-Job-Training, Associate Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, Professional Degree, and Postsecondary Vocational Training.

On the Career Planning Worksheet, you record information about education required, projected earning, job outlook, skills, and next step.

RIASEC Inventory
A Quick and Easy Assessment

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The RIASEC Inventory

  • Uses Holland’s RIASEC coding system and latest O*NET job titles
  • Scores into six interest areas: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional
  • Quick, 4-page assessment takes only 10-15 minutes to complete

The Holland Code inventory gives individuals a fast and informative way to explore occupations based on their interests. Using the RIASEC system developed by John Holland–the most widely used occupational interest coding system available.

Use this inventory to identify their job interests.

Complete only 72 work activity statements.

Match results those interests to potential careers.

The Holland Code inventory, a quick and easy assessment, is perfect for job seekers who have little time to spend on testing and career exploration.

Self Directed Search

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The Self-Directed Search is –

  • Low cost – Save money.
  • Easy to use – Complete the career self assessment test in 30 minutes.
  • Tested, proven, and dependable – Used by over 22 million people worldwide.

Use the Self-Directed Search to –

  • Get information on your personalities, interests, abilities, and skills. Know your strengths, interests, abilities, and skills.
  • Find careers that maximize your personalities, interests, abilities, and skills.
  • Narrow your career options. Save time and money. Eliminate careers that do not match your personalities, interests, abilities, and skills.

Find careers that will be most satisfying, appealing, and interesting to you.

Use the Self-Directed Search to explore careers.

Self Directed Search Form R is for adults, college students, and high school students. Form R is available in PRINTED or INTERNET Versions. The New! The Occupations Finder-Revised Edition now includes occupations that have emerged as a result of technological advances (e.g., Internet). The occupations have been updated and revised, and the jobs are referenced with the Occupational Information (O*NET) database. The Occupations Finder also provides the educational development level that each occupation requires and includes an alphabetical list of the occupations. Self-Directed Search Form R Occupations Finder has a list of 1,309 occupations matched to Holland Codes.

Self Directed Search Form E is for adults and teens who need easier-to-read format.

Self Directed Search Form Career Explorer is for middle school students.

Strong Interest Inventory

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For nearly 80 years, the Strong Interest Inventory assessment has guided thousands of individuals in exploring careers and college majors. The Strong Interest Inventory assessment is the most respected and widely used career planning instrument in the world.

The Strong Inventory is a professional career interest inventory that is –

  • Well researched and extensively validated
  • Used by career coaches and college counselors worldwide

The Strong Interest Inventory is an on-line Holland Code assessment that helps you identify –

  • Interests
  • Holland Codes
  • Careers

The results include –

  • Scores on the level of interest on each of the six Holland Codes or General Occupational Themes. Holland Code Themes include – Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional.
  • Scores on 25 Basic Interest Scales (e.g. art, science, and public speaking)
  • Scores on 211 Occupational Scales which indicate the similarity between the respondent’s interests and those of people working in each of the 211 occupations.
  • Scores on 4 Personal Style Scales (learning, working, leadership, and risk-taking).
  • Scores on 3 Administrative Scales used to identify test errors or unusual profiles.

The Strong Interest Inventory has six (6) sections –

  • General Themes – Description of the interrelationship between Holland Codes and interests, work activities, potential skills, personal values
  • Basic Interest Scales – Identification of your Highest Holland Code Themes, Holland Theme Code, Standard Score, and Interest Level
    Basic Interest Scales point to work activities, projects, course work, and leisure activities that are personally motivating and rewarding. The Interest Scale Levels are Very Little, Little, Moderate, high, Very High.
    Your Basic Interest Scales Report will give you your TOP FIVE Interest Areas and the Areas of Least Interest.
  • Occupational Scales – Comparison of your likes and dislikes with those people who are satisfied working in various occupations.
    The Occupational Scales matches your interests to 122 occupations. Your score matched the likes and dislikes of people who are working in and are satisfied that career. The occupations are an example of a larger job cluster. The TOP TEN Occupations are the careers that most closely match your interests. Within each Holland Code Theme, you will find careers that you are Dissimilar, Midrange, or Similar to your score, likes, and dislikes.
  • Personal Style Scales – Description of relationship between Holland Code Themes, work styles, learning, risk taking, and team work. Examples of Personal Style Scales include – Working with People, Enjoying helping others, Preferring practical learning environments, Preferring short-term training, Taking charge of others, Taking risks, Making quick decisions, and Working on teams.
  • Profile Summary – Overview of Your Highest Themes, Your Theme code, Your Top Five Interest Areas, Your Areas of Least Interest, Your Top Ten Strong Occupations, Occupations of Dissimilar Interest, and Your Personal Style Scales Preferences
  • Response Summary – Summary of the Occupations, Subject Areas, Activities, Leisure Activities, People, and Characteristics Sections. You receive information about the number of responses in each section that were Strongly Like, Like, Indifferent, Dislike, or Strong Dislike.

Transferable Skills (TS) Survey

Transferable Skills Scale

The TS Survey is a researched and validated assessment. The TS Survey is a short assessment that identifies an individual’s strongest soft (TS) skills skills. The eight (8) soft (TS) skills Skills are:

  • Analytical
  • Numerical
  • Interpersonal
  • Organizational
  • Physical
  • Informational
  • Communicative
  • Creative skills

The benefits of the TS Survey are –

  • Complete in 20-25 minutes
  • Is easy to use
  • Has color-coded design
  • Is Self-scoring and self-interpreting
  • Can be used as both a career exploration guide and a job search strategy tool
  • Includes suggested resources for career exploration as well as a worksheet for comparing possible careers
  • Includes job titles from the most recent O*NET database
  • Can be given to groups or individuals

The TS Survey has 5 sections –

  1. Mark Your Answers
  2. Add Your Scores
  3. Interpret Your Scores
  4. Identify Occupations that Match Your Skills
  5. Explore Occupations that Match Your Skills

Reference material for the The TS Survey lists the relationship between Soft Skills and Holland Codes. 

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