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Archive for the ‘career development’ Category

Make Different Career Choices for 2018

Dreamjob1

 

Are you looking for solutions for 2018 to answer the question “How do I make the right career choices”?

Use our three career discovery steps to make right career choices.

Step One: Get a Clear Career Goal

The first step in making career choices is setting a career goal.

In order to set a career goal, you have to take inventory of yourself to determine what you can offer an employer.

You need to –

  • Build awareness, knowledge and understanding of our strengths, interests, abilities, and skills
  • List your ambitions, values, education, and experiences
  • Determine your job preferences –job duties, salary, geographic location, and work conditions

Step Two: Explore Career Options

In order to make a career choice, you will need to career exploration resources to gather the following occupational information –

  • Labor market
  • Work industries
  • Companies, organizations, or agencies
  • Specific careers

Use online career exploration resources to identify potential careers.

Step Three: Overcome Career Roadblocks

When you are trying to reach your goal, there may be obstacles.  You solve career problems by completing the following steps –

  • Identify educational and career planning obstacles
  • Create solutions or courses of action
  • Set achievable goals
  • Resolve conflicts
  • Commit to reach our goals

Problem solving should take into consideration personal interests, skills, values, and financial resources. Big problems are broken down into smaller, more manageable steps. Achievable goals result in the production of new competencies, attitudes, and solutions.

As an individual, you:

  • Set, formulate, prioritize, and rank goals
  • Clearly state our vocational interests, abilities, and values
  • Derive plans or strategies to implement the solutions
  • Make a commitment to complete the plans
  • Understand decision-making processes
  • Evaluate the primary choice
  • Consider a secondary occupational choice, if necessary

Decision-making processes include:

  • Develop a career plan
  • Identify potential occupations
  • Selecting appropriate educational programs
  • Figuring the costs of educational training
  • Considering the impact of career decisions.

Step Four: Execution
You execute your career plans when you use different strategies –

  • Reality testing
  • Social Media
  • Job Search Strategies – Resume Writing and Interview Preparation

Reality Testing
While implementing and, you translate vocational interests, abilities, and skills into job opportunities. You do reality testing by implementing the following strategies –

  • Informational interviewing
  • Networking
  • Job shadowing
  • Internships
  • Part-time employment
  • Full-time employment
  • Volunteer work

Social Media and Networking Tools
Networking can help you validate your career choices.  You can use a variety of social media tools to learn and connect with professional associations and potential employers. Major networking social media tools are –

  • Instagram
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
  • Facebook

Ready to begin planning for the New Year…  Need help deciding?  Contact us at explorecareers@gmail.com

 

A Look at Holland Codes and Career Clusters – Two Sides of a Coin

two-sidedcoin

Two Sides of a Coin – There are two popular ways to build self awareness and explore careers.

Career Clusters and Holland Codes 

logo2-360

 

Holland Codes is a tool that matches interests to careers.  A Career Cluster
is a group of jobs and industries that are related by skills or
products.

Holland Codes

The Holland Codes identify interest areas, personalities, work environments and careers. The Holland Code Work Interest Areas are:

  • Realistic
  • Investigative
  • Artistic
  • Social
  • Enterprising
  • Conventional

The 16 Career Clusters® & 79 Career Pathways

After 50 years of research, there are research has reported the following 16 Career Clusters® & 79 Career Pathways –

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

  • Agribusiness Systems
  • Animal Systems
  • Environmental Service Systems
  • Food Products & Processing Systems
  • Natural Resources Systems
  • Plant Systems
  • Power, Structural & Technical Systems

Architecture & Construction

  • Construction
  • Design/ Pre-Construction
  • Maintenance/ Operations

Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications

  • A/V Technology & Film
  • Journalism & Broadcasting
  • Performing Arts
  • Printing Technology
  • Telecommunications
  • Visual Arts

Business Management & Administration

  • Administrative Support
  • Business Information Management
  • General Management
  • Human Resources Management
  • Operations Management

Education & Training

  • Administration & Administrative Support
  • Professional Support Services
  • Teaching/ Training

Finance

  • Accounting
  • Banking Services
  • Business Finance
  • Insurance
  • Securities & Investments

Government & Public Administration

  • Foreign Service
  • Governance
  • National Security
  • Planning
  • Public Management & Administration
  • Regulation
  • Revenue & Taxation

Health Science

  • Biotechnology Research & Development
  • Diagnostic Services
  • Healthy Information
  • Support Services
  • Therapeutic Services

Hospitality & Tourism

  • Lodging
  • Recreation, Amusements & Attractions
  • Restaurants & Food/ Beverage Services
  • Travel & Tourism

Human Services

  • Consumer Services
  • Counseling & Mental Health Services
  • Early Childhood Development & Services
  • Family & Community Services
  • Personal Care Services

Information Technology 

  • Information Support & Services
  • Network Systems
  • Programming & Software Development
  • Web & Digital Communications

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

  • Correction Services
  • Emergency & Fire Management Services
  • Law Enforcement Services
  • Legal Services
  • Security & Protective Services

Manufacturing

  • Healthy, Safety & Environmental Assurance
  • Logistics & Inventory Control
  • Maintenance, Installation & Repair
  • Manufacturing Production Process Development
  • Production
  • Quality Assurance

Marketing 

  • Marketing Communications
  • Marketing Management
  • Marketing Research
  • Merchandising
  • Professional Sales

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

  • Engineering & Technology
  • Science & Mathematics

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics ​

  • Facility & Mobile Equipment Maintenance
  • Health, Safety & Environmental Management
  • Logistics Planning & Management Services
  • Sales & Service
  • Transportation Operations
  • Transportation Systems/ Infrastructure Planning, Management & Regulation
  • Warehousing & Distribution Center Operations

HollandCodes.com has developed resources that show the relationship
between the Career Clusters, Green Careers and Holland Codes –

  • Career Clusters and Holland Codes Cross-Reference Table
  • Green Careers, Career Clusters and Holland Codes Reference Guide

Career Clusters and Holland Codes Cross-Reference Table

Here is an example of the Career Clusters and Holland Codes Cross-Reference Table.
Holland Code
Holland Codes Personality Type (1)
Holland Codes Personality Type (2)
GOE Interest Areas
RI
Realistic Investigative Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
R Realistic Architecture & Construction
R Realistic Manufacturing
R Realistic Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Green Careers, Career Clusters and Holland Codes Reference Guide

referenceguide350

The Green Careers, Career Clusters and Holland Codes Reference Guide provides detailed descriptions of more than 150
occupations, covering topics such as:

  • O*NET-SOC Codes
  • Job titles
  • Green occupational
    categories
  • Interest areas/ Holland Codes
  • Career clusters/ career
    cluster pathways
  • Daily tasks (what workers do on the job).

The O*NET-SOC Codes is useful to find out additional
information about the working conditions, the training and education
needed, earnings, and expected job prospects.

This guide is an excellent reference for many different tasks –

  • Career exploration
  • Lesson planning
  • College majors
  • Career planning
  • Occupational research

The Green Careers, Career Clusters and Holland Codes resources are part of the extensive library of resources found in the Hollandcodes.com Master Course for Professionals.

Enjoy the summer! Free career test!

Complete the form on our @careersocialmedia Instagram page –

Looking for more than a career test!

Are you having trouble setting career goals? In searching for the right career, there are so many options and decisions. Hollandcodes.com has the tools that will help you to make the right career decisions.

Overview

There are three steps in career planning cycle that will help you achieve your career goals and search for a career.

Step One: Get a Clear Career Goal

The first step in search for a job is setting a career goal.

In order to set a career goal, you have to take inventory of yourself to determine what you can offer an employer.

You need to –

  • Build awareness, knowledge and understanding of our strengths, interests, abilities, and skills
  • List your ambitions, values, education, and experiences
  • Determine your job preferences –job duties, salary, geographic location, and work conditions

Step Two: Explore Career Options

In order to identify potential careers, you may use career exploration and
social media resources to gather the following occupational information –

  • Labor market
  • Work industries
  • Companies, organizations, or agencies
  • Specific careers

Use online career exploration resources to identify potential careers.

Step Three: Overcome Career Roadblocks

When you are trying to reach a career goal, there will always be
obstacles. You solve career problems by completing the following steps –

  • Identify educational and career planning obstacles
  • Create solutions or courses of action
  • Set achievable goals
  • Resolve conflicts
  • Commit to reach our goals

Problem solving should take into consideration personal interests, skills, values, and financial resources. Big problems are broken down into smaller, more
manageable steps. Achievable goals result in the production of new
competencies, attitudes, and solutions.

As an individual, you:

  • Set, formulate, prioritize, and rank goals
  • Clearly state our vocational interests, abilities, and values
  • Derive plans or strategies to implement the solutions
  • Make a commitment to complete the plans
  • Understand decision-making processes
  • Evaluate the primary choice
  • Consider a secondary occupational choice, if necessary

Decision-making processes include:

  • Develop a career plan
  • Identify potential occupations
  • Select appropriate educational programs
  • Figure the costs of educational training
  • Consider the impact of career decisions

Step Four: Execution

You execute your career plans when you use different strategies –

  • Reality testing
  • Social Media
  • Job Search Strategies – Resume Writing and Interview Preparation

Reality Testing

While implementing and, you translate vocational interests, abilities, and
skills into job opportunities. You do reality testing by implementing
the following strategies –

  • Informational interviewing
  • Networking
  • Job shadowing
  • Internships
  • Part-time employment
  • Full-time employment
  • Volunteer work

We have a variety of different topics that we use different career/ academic advising sessions –

  • Selecting Career test
  • Different career tests
  • Other career topics – social media, resume writing and interviewing

Different Career Tests

We offer assistance with interpreting the following tests –

 Get more details about our career and academic coaching

3 Questions You’re Not Asking That Will Guide Your Career Choice.

Brad Minton, MS, LPC, NCC

Career and Academic Counselor, Instructor, Speaker

Reproduced with permission from author

Minton, B. (2016, September 9).3 Questions You’re Not Asking That Will Guide Your Career Choice. Retrieved from https://www.linkedin.com

Working with teenagers and young adults everyday who are coming to college is extremely rewarding, and educational to say the least. Being a career counselor, I have the task of helping students discover their education and career path. The one thing that I have come to discover in the process of helping them is their ideas about career are usually fairly vague.

That in and of itself is not the issue.  Most experts agree that as many as half of all college freshman have not solidified their major and/or career choice, and 75% will end up changing their path as they work towards their degree. Uncertainty is a completely understandable and expected aspect of being a new college student.

However, over time, eventually students will start attempting to gain more clarity on their vision for the future and it is here where the problems arise. Generally the first mistake they make is simply choosing a major or career path too hastily, rather than doing the necessary self-exploration. They feel compelled to simply “choose one”, and unfortunately, it is this rush to decision that leads so many to change their majors two and three times before graduation. They simply didn’t understand what they were getting into.

If they are in fact, taking some valuable time to process their decisions, they still can falter and get off track. How? By simply asking themselves the wrong questions.

Because we tend to associate our work and our careers with time spent (roughly a third of our adult life), one of the first questions students tend to ask is “Will I like what I’m doing?”, or “Will I have an interest in it?”. While interest is absolutely a necessary ingredient to career satisfaction, the question that needs to be asked is “Will this career give me fulfillment?“. You can have interest in a lot of things but they may not fulfill you in a career unless you find the modality which allows you to combine both your interests and your values. Values are the key ingredient which most closely leads to fulfillment because they speak to your soul. They are characteristics of you that cannot be easily negotiated. Interests and values can conflict. If I have a value for autonomy and an interest in computers, I could end up feeling restricted because it may not give me the independence I need depending on the type of work and setting. So again, the deeper question is not what is just going to interest me, but what is going to fulfill me.

A second question students ask themselves often is “What do I want to do?”. The reason this question is often not going to provide as much substance to their career choices is that is focuses more on activities rather than purpose. You can give anyone tasks to complete and they will do it……for a period of time. Eventually, the question will arise of why does it matter? Knowing what to do, works in the short term, but knowing why will ultimately make it last, because the why determines the level of investment by giving the activities a purpose. The key question that students must get to is “Why do I want to do…?”

The third question that tends to come up a lot is “What do I want to get?”. Students are focused in on the perks of working: salary, vacations, retirement, advancement, independence, etc. The main reason why this is of less importance is simply because all of those things will change with time and location. How much money you think you should be earning will change as you advance. Technology will ultimately change how you work. Your level of advancement will change. You’re colleagues will change. Everything in the labor market is moving at a tremendous speed and constantly evolving, thus whatever monetary gain you get from it, is subject to the same. The deeper question you have to ask is not what I want to get, but “What do I want to give?“.

By asking yourself this vital question it ties into your fulfillment AND purpose on the deepest level of all. Giving is the ultimate sacrifice, and when we decide to give, we make the resolution that it is for a higher purpose than ourselves. What you choose to give the world is your way of making your unique mark which builds you up, plus it will provide you with more satisfaction than anything you could get, because you’ve fully committed to the purpose that fulfills you.

Additional note:  We hope that you enjoyed Brad Minton’s article.  Get more information about career exploration tools!

Make Different Career Choices

Dreamjob1

 

Are you looking for solutions to answer the question “How do I make different career choices”?

Use our three career discovery steps to make right career choices.

Step One: Get a Clear Career Goal

The first step in making career choices is setting a career goal.

In order to set a career goal, you have to take inventory of yourself to determine what you can offer an employer.

You need to –

  • Build awareness, knowledge and understanding of our strengths, interests, abilities, and skills
  • List your ambitions, values, education, and experiences
  • Determine your job preferences –job duties, salary, geographic location, and work conditions

Step Two: Explore Career Options

In order to make a career choice, you will need to career exploration resources to gather the following occupational information –

  • Labor market
  • Work industries
  • Companies, organizations, or agencies
  • Specific careers

Use online career exploration resources to identify potential careers.

Step Three: Overcome Career Roadblocks

When you are trying to reach your goal, there may be obstacles.  You solve career problems by completing the following steps –

  • Identify educational and career planning obstacles
  • Create solutions or courses of action
  • Set achievable goals
  • Resolve conflicts
  • Commit to reach our goals

Problem solving should take into consideration personal interests, skills, values, and financial resources. Big problems are broken down into smaller, more manageable steps. Achievable goals result in the production of new competencies, attitudes, and solutions.

As an individual, you:

  • Set, formulate, prioritize, and rank goals
  • Clearly state our vocational interests, abilities, and values
  • Derive plans or strategies to implement the solutions
  • Make a commitment to complete the plans
  • Understand decision-making processes
  • Evaluate the primary choice
  • Consider a secondary occupational choice, if necessary

Decision-making processes include:

  • Develop a career plan
  • Identify potential occupations
  • Selecting appropriate educational programs
  • Figuring the costs of educational training
  • Considering the impact of career decisions.

Step Four: Execution
You execute your career plans when you use different strategies –

  • Reality testing
  • Social Media
  • Job Search Strategies – Resume Writing and Interview Preparation

Reality Testing
While implementing and, you translate vocational interests, abilities, and skills into job opportunities. You do reality testing by implementing the following strategies –

  • Informational interviewing
  • Networking
  • Job shadowing
  • Internships
  • Part-time employment
  • Full-time employment
  • Volunteer work

Social Media and Networking Tools
Networking can help you validate your career choices.  You can use a variety of social media tools to learn and connect with professional associations and potential employers. Major networking social media tools are –

  • Instagram
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
  • Facebook

We are specialists in career social media.

Ready to assess your interest and skills…

Time for Positive Change!

Summer is a time for Reflection, Growth and Renewal

 thinking

 Take the time to reevaluate where you are and what you are doing.

 signs

What are your interests, abilities and skills?

 hollandblue

Do those interests, abilities and skills match your current job?

 blueclock

If not, is it time to make a change? What are your plans to reach your career goals?

 questions

Trying to make a decision, but there are so many choices.

We are providing you with information about the top 5 career tests .  All of these resources will help –

  • Build awareness of the interests, abilities and skills.
  • Provide resources to explore careers. Learn about salaries, job duties, job outlook, training requirements, and more.
  • Research colleges to find our information about admission requirements, available programs, tuition, learning options (on-camous or online), payment options, scholarships, and more.

mbti3

MBTI®

  • Format: On-Line
  • Reading Level: Youth/ Adult/ Children
  • Subject Area: Personality Styles, Occupations

mycareer

My Career Profile

  • Format: On-Line
  • Reading Level: Youth/ Adult/ Children
  • Subject Area: Holland Codes, Interests, Abilities/Skills, Values
  • Databases: Occupations and Colleges/ Universities

 

sdsinternet

Self Directed Search

  • Format: Printed/On-Line
  • Reading Level: Youth/ Adult/ Children
  • Subject Area: Holland Codes, Interests, Occupations

 strong3

Strong Interest Inventory®

  • Format: On-Line
  • Reading Level: Youth/ Adult/ Children
  • Subject Area: Holland Codes, Interests, Occupations

 career-decision

Career Decision Making Tool

  • Format: On-Line
  • Reading Level: High school student, college student, adult
  • Subject Area: Holland Codes, Interests, Occupations
  • Databases: Occupations and Colleges/ Universities
  • Best Buy:  Immediate access, customizable, comparable to more expensive inventories

 

We are here to help you at explorecareersandcollegemajors.com!

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