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The O*NET is one of the world’s premier career exploration and occupational research tools.

The O*NET On-Line and Content Model had six descriptors or domains –

  • Worker Characteristics
  • Worker Requirements
  • Experience Requirements
  • Occupation Requirements
  • Occupation Specific
  • Occupation Characteristics

Worker Characteristics are the acquired knowledge, skills, effective work performance.

  • Abilities — Qualities that influence performance
  • Occupational Interests — Preferences for work environments
  • Work Values —Specific needs that are important to a person’s satisfaction
  • Work Styles — Personal characteristics that can affect how well someone performs a job.

Worker Requirements are characteristics descriptors relating to work-related qualities that are acquired and/or developed through experience and education.

  • Basic Skills — Developed abilities that facilitate learning or the gaining of knowledge
  • Cross-Functional Skills — Developed skills that increase performance of activities that occur across jobs
  • Knowledge — System of principles and facts
  • Education — Prior educational experience required to perform in a job

Experience Requirements — requirements that are required to perform to work activities and explicitly linked to certain types of work activities.

Experience and Training — When someone is hired to perform a job, there are the following requirements –

  • Basic Skills – Entry Requirement — Entry requirement for skills that are need to increase learning or the gaining of knowledge
  • Cross-Functional Skills – Entry Requirement — Entry requirement for developed abilities and skills that impove performance of activities that occur across jobs
  • Licensing — Licenses, certificates, or registrations that are awarded to show that a job holder has gained certain skills.

Occupation-Specific Information

  • Tasks — Occupation-Specific Tasks
  • Tools and Technology — Machines, equipment, tools, software, and information technology workers used to perform work tasks.

Workforce Characteristics

  • Labor Market Information — Current labor force characteristics of occupations
  • Occupational Outlook — Future labor force characteristics of occupations

Occupational Requirements are factors that describe what various occupations require.

  • Generalized Work Activities — General types of job behaviors
  • Detailed Work Activities — Detailed types of job behaviors
  • Organizational Context — Characteristics of the organization that influence how people do their work
  • Work Context — Physical and social factors that influence the nature of work

Source: O*NET OnLine Career Exploration Tools

DOL/ETA (U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration) is  the exclusive owner of all rights under U.S. copyright laws and international treaty provisions in the O*NET ™ Career Exploration Tools.
Any other copyright notices refer only to Learning for Life Resource
Center’s original work in the product.

O*NET and O*NET IN IT and logos are trademarks of the DOL/ETA (U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration).

Here are O*NET career exploration tools –

  • Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • O*NET and Holland Codes Fact Sheets
  • Career Interests Inventory

Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook

For Doing In-Depth Research on Job Descriptions, Career Options, and Education Options

Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook 

The Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook is:

  • Must-read resource for counselors and teachers
  • An essential reference book that is a requirement for any career advisement, counseling, or counseling program, library, or resource room

The Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook is the best reference guide available that lists information about:

  • Career Clusters/ GOE Interest Groups
  • Holland Codes
  • ONET Codes
  • Job descriptions

The Handbook has more than 6,500 job descriptions — more than in any other career research book:

  • All job descriptions from the Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • Plus thousands more from the ONet and Dictionary of Occupational Titles

The Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook combines information from the most authoritative occupational data sources:

  • Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • O*NET database
  • Dictionary of Occupational Titles
  • Dictionary of Holland Occupational Codes

How to use the Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook

The major tools to using the Enhanced Occupational Outlook Handbook are:

  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction
  • Appendix
  • Indexes
The Table of Contents lists the following interest clusters or job groupings:
  • Management, Business, and Financial Operations Occupations
  • Professional and Related Occupations
  • Service Occupations
  • Sales and Related Occupations
  • Office and Administrative Support Occupations
  • Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations
  • Construction, Trades, and Related Workers
  • Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations
  • Production Occupations
  • Transportation and Material Moving Occupations
  • Job Opportunities in the Armed Forces

The Introduction section provides information of the following topics:

  • Occupational Outlook Handbook and Job Descriptions
  • O*NET and Job Descriptions
  • Dictionary of Occupational Titles and Job Descriptions
  • 16 GOE Interest Areas
  • Holland Personality Types
  • OOH Job Descriptions
From the Occupational Outlook Handbook and Job Descriptions, you receive the listing of the following topics:
  • Job Title and O*NET Job Numbers
  • Holland Personality Types
  • Significant Points
  • Nature of the Work
  • Working Conditions
  • Employment
  • Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement
  • Job Outlook
  • Earning
  • Related Occupations
  • Sources of Additional Information

The Appendix has information about Tomorrow’s Jobs discussing changes in:

  • Population
  • Labor Force
  • Employment
  • Industry
  • Occupation
  • Education
  • Total Openings
The Handbook are two (2) Indexes:
  • Alphabetized Index of Major Job Titles from Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • Alphabetized Index of ONET and DOT Job Titles

O*NET and Holland Codes Fact Sheets

The benefits of the O*NET and Holland Codes FACT Sheetsare –

  • Low cost
  • Easy to read format
  • Comprehensive and detailed lists
  • Latest career information
  • Links between Holland Codes and O*NET Codes
  • Summary of information from reliable source – Occupational Information Network

Using the ONET, the Occupational Information Network, Hollandcodes.com is preparing FACT SHEETS that will highlight the relationship between careers, O*NET Codes, Holland Codes, and the following factors –

  • Tasks
  • Knowledge
  • Skills
  • Abilities
  • Work Activities
  • Work Context
  • Job Zone
  • Interests
  • Work Values

O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets

O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets lists the –

  • O*NET-SOC Code
  • O*NET-SOC Job Title
  • Holland Codes
  • Description
Educational Levels Required for Different Occupations O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets

O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets – Educational Levels Required for Different Occupations lists the required levels of education from the selected sample. The largest number of people had one of the following levels of education

  • Less than a High School Diploma
  • High School Diploma (or GED or High School Equivalence Certificate)
  • Post-Secondary Certificate
  • Some College Courses
  • Associate’s Degree (or other 2-year degree)
  • Bachelor’s Degree
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
  • Master’s Degree
  • Post-Master’s Certificate
  • First Professional Degree
  • Doctoral Degree
  • Post-Doctoral Training

Ability Areas for Different Occupations O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets

O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets – Ability Areas for Different Occupations lists the following Ability Areas –

  • Cognitive Abilities — Abilities that influence the acquisition and application of knowledge in problem solvingnformation Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
    • Mathematical Reasoning — The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
    • Memorization — The ability to remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures.
    • Number Facility — The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
    • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
    • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Physical Abilities — Abilities that influence strength, endurance, flexibility, balance and coordination.
  • Psychomotor Abilities — Abilities that influence the capacity to manipulate and control objects
  • Sensory Abilities — Abilities that influence visual, auditory and speech perception

Job Zones O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets

O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets – Job Zones lists the following Job Zones –

  • Job Zone One: Little or No Preparation Needed
  • Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
  • Job Zone Three: Medium Preparation Needed
  • Job Zone Four: Considerable Preparation Needed
  • Job Zone Five: Extensive Preparation Needed
For each Job Level, there is information about –
  • Experience
  • Education
  • Job Training
  • Examples of job skills
  • Examples of occupations

Knowledge Areas, O*NET Codes, and Holland Codes FACT Sheets

O*NET Codes and Holland Codes FACT Sheets – Knowledge Areas lists the following Knowledge Areas –

  • Knowledge
  • Administration and Management
  • Biology
  • Building and Construction
  • Chemistry
  • Clerical
  • Communications and Media
  • Computers and Electronics
  • Customer and Personal Service
  • Design
  • Economics and Accounting
  • Education and Training
  • Engineering and Technology
  • English Language
  • Fine Arts
  • Food Production
  • Foreign Language
  • Geography
  • History and Archeology
  • Law and Government
  • Mathematics
  • Mechanical
  • Medicine and Dentistry
  • Personnel and Human Resources
  • Philosophy and Theology
  • Physics
  • Production and Processing
  • Psychology
  • Public Safety and Security
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Sociology and Anthropology
  • Therapy and Counseling
  • Transportation
Source: O*NET ™ Career Exploration Tools
DOL/ETA (U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration) is the exclusive owner of all rights under U.S. copyright laws and international treaty provisions in the O*NET ™ Career Exploration Tools. Any other copyright notices refer only to Learning for Life Resource Center’s original work in the product.

O*NET and O*NET IN IT and logos are trademarks of the DOL/ETA (U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration).

career interest inventory

Career Interests Inventory

The Career Interests Inventory,  a printed, career self assessment test, measures Holland Codes, personalities, and careers. Here is some information about the inventory. The Career Interests Inventory measures six Holland Occupational Codes

  • Realistic
  • Investigative
  • Artistic
  • Social
  • Enterprising and
  • Conventional

The Inventory is a version of Dept. of Labor’s O*NET Interest Profile.
O*NET Career Interests Inventory is a 6-panel foldout inventory with
180 statements. The inventory takes about 30 minutes to complete. The
responses are added; the results are matched to the Holland (RIASEC)
Career Model and hundreds of related occupations. The occupations are
divided into categories based upon education, preparation, or training
requirements.

Read about O*NET Codes and Holland Codes products ….

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